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1859RedRidingHoodLuisAmmyBlanc

Little Red Riding Hood as depicted in an 1859 painting by Luis Ammy Blanc.

"Little Red Riding Hood" (French:"Le Petit Chaperon rouge"; German: "Rotkäppchen') is a European fairy tale. Similar stories also exist in African and Asian folklore. Although the story of "Little Red Riding Hood" probably originated many centuries ago, no text for it exists that it is older than the version written by the French author Charles Perrault and included in his 1697 anthology Histoires ou Contes du temps passé (Fairy Tales from Past Times with Morals or Mother Goose Tales). A different version of the story is included in Kinder und Hausmäechen (Children's and Household Tales), the 1812 anthology of German folktales compiled by the Brothers Grimm. The tale as many people in the English-speaking world know it today more closely resembles the Brothers Grimm version than the Charles Perrault one.

The story's title character and protagonist is a little girl who gets her name because of the red hooded cape that she usually wears. Little Red Riding Hood goes to visit her sick grandmother. On the way, she encounters a wolf. The wolf wants to eat Little Red Riding Hood but does not do so immediately. He asks the girl where she is going and Little Red Riding Hood tells him. By the time that Little Red Riding Hood arrives at her grandmother's house, the wolf has already eaten or otherwise disposed of the girl's grandmother and is lying in the old woman's bed. Little Red Riding Hood talks to the wolf, believing him to be her grandmother.

There have been numerous adaptations of "Little Red Riding Hood" to other media and the story is often referenced in popular culture.

Plot

Charles Perrault version

WalterCrane,LittleRedRidingHood-2

The wolf approaches Little Red Riding Hood. 1896 illustration by the British artist and writer Walter Crane.

There is a little village girl who is loved by everyone who sees her. Her mother and grandmother are especially fond of her. Her grandmother gives her a red cape with a hood. It looks so good on the girl that she becomes known as Little Red Riding Hood.

Little Red Riding Hood's mother makes a cake. She gives the cake and a pot of butter to the girl and tells her to take them to her grandmother, who has been ill. Little Red Riding Hood's grandmother lives in another village. In order to get there, Little Red Riding Hood has to pass through a forest. In the forest, a wolf comes up to Little Red Riding Hood. He would like to eat her but is unable to do so at that moment because there are some woodcutters nearby. The wolf asks the girl where she is going. Not knowing that it is dangerous to talk to wolves, Little Red Riding Hood tells him that she is taking a cake and some butter to her sick grandmother. The wolf asks Little Red Riding Hood where her grandmother lives. She points out her grandmother's house to him. It is the first one in the village and it is just beyond a mill. The wolf says that he will go to Little Red Riding Hood's grandmother's house too. He says that he will take one path and tells Little Red Riding Hood to take a different one. The wolf knows that the path that he has chosen for himself is the shorter one. Little Red Riding Hood also takes some time to get to her grandmother's house because she stops to gather nuts, pick flowers and chase butterflies.

The wolf arrives at Little Red Riding Hood's grandmother's house and knocks at the door. The sick old woman asks who is there because she cannot get out of bed. Disguising his voice, the wolf says that he is Little Red Riding Hood. The old woman says that the door is not locked. As soon as he is inside the house, the wolf, who has not eaten for three days, falls on the old woman and eats her. He then gets into her bed.

GustaveDore She was astonished to see how her grandmother looked

The wolf and Little Red Riding Hood in bed. 1867 illustration by the French artist Gustave Doré.

Little Red Riding Hood knocks on the door. Attempting to disguise his voice, the wolf tells her that the door is not locked. The voice sounds somewhat strange to Little Red Riding Hood but she assumes that is because her grandmother has a cold. When Little Red Riding Hood comes inside the house, the wolf hides under the bedclothes. He tells Little Red Riding Hood to put the cake and butter to one side, take off her clothes and get into bed with him. She does as she is told. She then sees the wolf but believes him to be her naked grandmother. Little Red Riding Hood says that the wolf has big legs. The wolf replies that he can run better with them. Little Red Riding Hood says that the wolf has big ears. He answers that he can hear better with them. Little Red Riding Hood says that the wolf has big teeth. The wolf says that he has the big teeth so that he can eat the girl. He falls on Little Red Riding Hood and eats her.

Charles Perrault obviously saw the story as a metaphor for a young woman falling victim to a sexual predator. Perrault's version of "Little Red Riding Hood" ends with a verse which says that the moral of the story is that young people, especially pretty young girls, should not talk to everyone who approaches them. Perrault goes on to say that many men who appear to be kind and gentle are really dangerous wolves in disguise.

Brothers Grimm version

Arpad Schmidhammer - Rotkäppchen-Verlag Josef Scholz, Mainz ca 1910

Front cover of an early 20th century German picture book edition of "Little Red Riding Hood" illustrated by Arpad Schmidhammer.

The ending of the Brothers Grimm version of "Little Red Riding Hood" is quite different from how Charles Perrault's version of the story ends. The first part of the Brothers Grimm version, up to the point in the story when the wolf swallows the girl, does not differ significantly from the version that Perrault wrote. There are, however, some other minor differences.

In the Brothers Grimm version of the story, Little Red Riding Hood takes cake and wine, rather than cake and butter, to her grandmother. The girl's grandmother does not live in another village but in a house in the forest some distance from Little Red Riding Hood's village. The wolf does not eat Little Red Riding Hood when he sees her in the forest because he thinks he can come up with a clever plan that will allow him to eat both her and her grandmother. So that he can get to her grandmother's house first, the wolf points out some beautiful flowers to Little Red Riding Hood. The girl then leaves the path and goes into the forest to pick the flowers. The wolf remains on the path. After the wolf has swallowed Little Red Riding Hood's grandmother, he puts on her nightclothes, a detail which is not included in Charles Perrault's version of the tale. When Little Red Riding hood arrives at her grandmother's house, the front door is still open and she feels strangely uneasy as she steps inside. Little Red Riding Hood tells the wolf that he has large ears, eyes and hands. The wolf replies that he has large hands so that he can hug Little Red Riding Hood better. The girl tells the wolf that he has a horrible large mouth before he swallows her.

DBP 1960 342 Wohlfahrt Rotkäppchen

Postage stamp issued in West Germany in 1960 which depicts the huntsman about to cut open the sleeping wolf.

After he swallows Little Red Riding Hood, the wolf falls asleep and begins to snore loudly. The snoring attracts the attention of a huntsman who goes inside the house. The huntsman is about to shoot the wolf when it occurs to him that the animal might have eaten Little Red Riding Hood's grandmother and that it might still be possible to save the old woman. The huntsman cuts the wolf's stomach open with a pair of scissors. Little Red Riding Hood and her grandmother both emerge from the wolf's stomach alive. Little Red Riding Hood then fills the wolf's stomach with stones. When the wolf wakes up, the weight of the heavy stones inside him makes him fall down and kills him.[1]

The Brothers Grimm version of "Little Red Riding Hood" ends with an episode involving another wolf that the girl meets when going to see her grandmother another time. Having learned from her previous experience, Little Red Riding Hood does not speak to the wolf when he approaches her. When she arrives at her grandmother's house, the girl tells the old woman about the wolf she saw. Shortly afterwards, the wolf knocks on the door, claiming to be Little Red Riding Hood. Neither Little Red Riding Hood nor her grandmother open the door. They stay quiet and still inside the house. The wolf climbs up on the roof, hoping to pounce on Little Red Riding Hood when she leaves the house in the evening. Little Red Riding Hood's grandmother has some water in which she boiled some sausages the day before. She tells Little Red Riding Hood to pour the water into a large stone trough in front of the house. When the girl has done that, the smell of the sausages reaches the wolf on the roof. He looks down to see where the smell is coming from, loses his balance, falls into the trough and drowns.

Other 19th century versions

The American poet, playwright, soldier and politician James Nelson Barker wrote a poem called "Little Red Riding Hood" that was first published in 1827. The poem takes the form of a conversation between a grandmother and an adolescent girl in which they discuss the fairy tale. The old woman tells her granddaughter that the story is not supposed to be taken literally and that the wolf in "Little Red Riding Hood" represents the danger of becoming distracted by love.

Little Red Riding Hood: an entirely new edition with new pictures by an eminent artist is an 1843 retelling of the story. According to the books' title page, it was edited by Felix Summerly. Felix Summerly is a pseudonym that was used by Sir Henry Cole, a British writer, inventor and civil servant who is widely credited with having invented the Christmas card.

Little Red Riding Hood pg 8

1843 illustration from Sir Henry Cole's Little Red Riding Hood: an entirely new edition with new pictures by an eminent artist.

Sir Henry Cole's version of the story includes many details that are absent both from the version written by Charles Perrault and the one written by the Brothers Grimm. Cole's "Little Red Riding Hood" is set in the New Forest in the English county of Hampshire. Little Red Riding Hood's grandmother lives in a place called Copthurst Gate. The action takes place in the autumn of some year long ago before the Industrial Revolution. Little Red Riding Hood's mother is a weaver and her father is a woodcutter.[2] Little Red Riding Hood is eight years-old. She received her hooded red cape as a present from her grandmother for her eighth birthday. Although Little Red Riding Hood is a cheerful girl who loves to play, she is also extremely hardworking. She spends a lot of her time helping her mother with the housework and working in the garden. She often takes lunch to her father in the forest. She regularly visits sick neighbors, not only her grandmother. From her grandmother, Little Red Riding Hood has learned many things, including how to be honest and brave, how to sing hymns and how to pray. Cole's Little Red Riding Hood also keeps bees. She decides to visit her sick grandmother because she thinks that some of her bees' honey will do the old woman some good.

Some woodcutters see the wolf approach Little Red Riding Hood in the forest. They offer to kill the animal but Little Red Riding Hood persuades them not to, saying that the wolf has not done her any harm. When Little Red Riding Hood sees the wolf in her grandmother's bed, she first says that the wolf has large ears. The wolf replies, "The better to hear with, my dear." Little Red Riding Hood says that the wolf has large eyes. The wolf replies, "The better to see you with, my dear." Little Red Riding Hood says that the wolf has a large nose. The wolf replies, "The better to smell with, my dear." Little Red Riding Hood says that the wolf has large white teeth. The wolf replies, "The better to eat you up."

Sir Henry Cole's version of "Little Red Riding Hood" has two alternative endings. The first ending is the same as the ending from Charles Perrault's version of the tale, the wolf eats Little Red Riding Hood. In the second ending, the wolf grabs hold of Little Red Riding Hood and she screams. Her father and some other woodcutters then rush in and kill the wolf. The woodcutters who saw Little Red Riding Hood with the wolf earlier were worried about her safety and went to get her father. All of the woodcutters then made their way to the girl's grandmother's house. The second ending is not a completely happy one, however, because the wolf has already eaten Little Red Riding Hood's grandmother and she cannot be saved.

In 1888, the French folklorist Charles Marelle wrote a version of "Little Red Riding Hood" called La Véritable histoire du Petit Chaperon d'or. An English translation, called "The True History of Little Goldenhood", is included in The Red Fairy Book, the 1890 anthology of folktales compiled by the Scottish folklorist Andrew Lang.[3]

Lewis Carroll Album I - Princeton University Library

1857 photograph of Agnes Grace Weld (1849-1915) dressed as Little Red Riding Hood. Photograph taken by Lewis Carroll.

Charles Marelle begins his story by saying that many lies have been written about the girl known as Little Red Riding Hood in the past. According to Marelle, the girl's real name is Blanchette. She becomes known as Little Goldenhood because of the hooded cloak the color of gold and fire that her grandmother gave her. Blanchette's grandmother is so old that she does not know how old she is. She is also rumored to be a witch. She tells Blanchette that her golden cloak is made of a ray of sunshine. Blanchette's cloak is rumored to have magical powers.

The majority of Marelle's tale does not differ very much from Charles Perrault's version. The ending, however, is quite different. When the wolf arrives at Blanchette's grandmother's house, he finds that there is nobody at home. That is because Blanchette's grandmother has gone to town to sell herbs. Nevertheless, the wolf puts on the old woman's nightcap and gets into her bed. The wolf tells Blanchette to take off her dress and get into bed with him. She does as she is told but keeps her golden hood on her head. Blanchette says that the wolf has hairy arms. He replies that they are better for hugging. The girl says that the wolf has a large tongue. He says that he can answer better with that tongue. Blanchette says that the wolf has a mouthful of large white teeth. He replies, "That's for crunching little children with." The wolf goes to eat Blanchette. His mouth is horribly burned by her magical golden hood and he runs around the house in pain. At that moment, Blanchette's grandmother returns. She holds open a large sack into which the wolf runs. Blanchette's grandmother then throws the wolf down a well and he drowns. The old woman says that she will use the wolf's skin to make a coat for Blanchette and will feed his carcass to the dogs.

Marelle ends his tale by saying that people who get up early may still see Blanchette walking about wearing her hood the color of the sun.

Origins

According to research carried out in 2013 by Jamie Tehrani, an anthropologist at the University of Durham, England, the story that later evolved into "Little Red Riding Hood" probably originated in the 1st century CE in the Middle East. From there, the story spread out into Asia, Africa and Europe. The story developed in different ways in different regions, partly as a result of the influence of other folktales, sometimes resulting in versions of the tale that are remarkably similar to the European "Little Red Riding Hood" story evolving independently in other parts of the world.[4]

It had previously been suggested that "Little Red Riding Hood" evolved out of the Chinese folktale "Great Aunt Tiger". The folktale tells how, through the use of a magic spell, a tiger takes on an almost completely human appearance but retains his tail. In order to appear fully human, the tiger needs to devour three children before dawn. The tiger passes himself off as the great aunt of three children, spends the night with them and manages to eat one of them. His deception is discovered by one girl who manages to outwit him. The earliest known text of the story was written in the 17th century by the Chinese poet Huang Zhing, who was a contemporary of Charles Perrault.

Le Petit Chaperon Rouge Palais Jacques Coeur

Stone carving on the exterior of the Palais Jacques Coeur, Bourges, central France.

Egbert of Liège, a French deacon who lived in the 10th century, wrote a Latin-language poem called De puella lupellis servata ("The Girl Saved from the Wolves"), which is considered to be a precursor to "Little Red Riding Hood". A 15th century stone carving on the exterior of the Palais Jacques Coeur, a large building in Bourges, central France, suggests that the story of "Little Red Riding Hood" existed before Charles Perrault's time. The carving appears to show a hooded girl carrying a basket. The girl appears to be walking through some trees, heading away from a small house and towards an animal which may be a wolf.

Once upon a time, WPA poster, ca. 1938

The wolf and Little Red Riding Hood as depicted on a 1930s American poster by an unknown artist.

It is unknown precisely what form the European "Little Red Riding Hood" story took before Charles Perrault's time. It may, however, have resembled the version of the story that the French folklorist Paul Delarue recorded having heard in Nièvres, central France in 1885. In the story that Delarue heard, an unnamed girl meets a werewolf while she is on her way to her grandmother's house. The werewolf takes a shorter path to the girl's grandmother's house and kills the old woman. He eats most of her body but puts some of her flesh in a kitchen cabinet and puts some of her blood in a bottle. When the girl arrives, the werewolf, impersonating the girl's grandmother, tells her to eat some meat (which is really the grandmother's flesh) and drink some wine (which is really the grandmother's blood). The werewolf then tells the girl to take off her clothes and get into bed with him. As she takes off each item of clothing, the girl asks the werewolf where she should put it. Each time, the werewolf tells her to throw it on the fire because she no longer needs it. The girl says that the werewolf is hairy, has long nails, large shoulders, large ears, large nostrils and a big mouth. The werewolf says that he has a large mouth so that he can eat the girl. The girl says that she has to defecate. The werewolf tells her that she can do that in the bed. The girl, however, insists on going outside. The werewolf reluctantly allows her to do that but he ties a rope around her foot first. When the girl goes outside, she takes the rope off her foot, ties it to a tree and runs away. The werewolf shouts after the girl to tell her to hurry up and come back inside. When she does not answer, the werewolf realizes that she has escaped. He runs after her and almost catches her. The girl is saved, however, because she manages to get back inside her own house just before the werewolf arrives there. There is no reference to a red hood in the story that Delarue heard.

Older stories in which somebody emerges unharmed from the belly of an animal, as in the Brothers Grimm's version of "Little Red Riding Hood", include the legend of Saint Margaret of Antioch, who was said to have survived being swallowed by a dragon, and the Biblical story of Jonah and the whale.

Adaptations

The British author and illustrator Beatrix Potter considered her 1908 children's picture book The Tale of Jemima Puddle-Duck to be a reworking of "Little Red Riding Hood".

"Little Red Riding Hood" is one of several fairy tales that are parodied in the British author Roald Dahl's 1982 children's poetry anthology Revolting Rhymes. The anthology was adapted as a British-German two-part computer generated animation mini-series. The two episodes were first shown on BBC One in the United Kingdom on December 26 and December 27, 2016.

The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories, the 1979 anthology of short horror stories by the British author Angela Carter, contains three stories inspired by "Little Red Riding Hood", namely "The Werewolf", "The Company of Wolves" and "Wolf-Alice"[5]. The three short stories were adapted into the 1984 British Gothic horror fantasy film The Company of Wolves, directed by Neil Jordan.

Film Daily cover - September 3 1922

Front cover of the September 3, 1922 issue of the American magazine Film Daily which promotes the 1922 silent movie Little Red Riding Hood starring the four year-old child star Baby Peggy. Baby Peggy was born Peggy-Jean Montgomery and later changed her name to Diana Serra Cary. Diana Serra Cary is the last living film star from the silent era.

Other live-action films inspired by "Little Red Riding Hood" include Little Red Riding Hood (UK 1911), Little Red Riding Hood (USA 1911), Little Red Riding Hood (Czechoslovakia 1920), Little Red Riding Hood (USA 1922), Little Red Riding Hood (France 1930), Good Enough to Eat (France 1951), Little Red Riding Hood (West Germany 1953), Little Red Riding Hood (Mexico 1960), Little Red Riding Hood and Friends (Mexico 1961), Tom Thumb and Little Red Riding Hood (Mexico 1962), Rotkäppchen (East Germany 1962), The Dangerous Christmas of Red Riding Hood (USA 1963), About the Little Red Riding Hood (USSR 1977), Deadtime Stories (USA 1986), The Red Spectacles (Japan 1987) Bye Bye Chaperon rouge (Canada 1989), Cannon Movie Tales: Red Riding Hood (Israel/USA 1989), The Erotic Adventures of Little Red Riding Hood (France/Italy 1993), Le Dernier Chaperon rouge (France 1996), Freeway (USA 1996), Little Red Riding Hood (USA 1997), Black XXX-Mas (Belgium 1999), Falsehood (USA 2001), Red Riding Hood (Italy 2003), Hard Candy (USA 2005), A Wicked Tale (Singapore 2005), Big Bad Wolves (New Zealand 2006), Red Riding Hood (USA 2006), Trick 'r Treat (Canada/USA 2007), Red: Werewolf Hunter (Canada 2010), Red Riding Hood (Canada 2011) and Avengers Grimm (USA 2015).

The 1922 American animated short Little Red Riding Hood is one of the earliest animated cartoons to have been made by Walt Disney and is considered to be Disney's first attempt at animated storytelling. It was made mostly by photographing inked lines on paper, rather than using animation cells. In the cartoon, the wolf s replaced by a villainous man in a top hat whose intentions towards Little Red Riding Hood appear to be sexual. Little Red Riding Hood is rescued from the villain by a heroic young man in an airplane. The film was believed to be lost for many years, until a print of it was discovered in London in 1998.

In the 1931 American animated cartoon Red Riding Hood from Van Beuren Studios, Little Red Riding Hood and her grandmother are both anthropomorphic mice who somewhat resemble Disney's Minnie Mouse. The sick elderly grandmother is given a tonic by her doctor which partially rejuvenates her. When she pours the tonic over herself, she looks young again. When the wolf arrives at grandma's house, he falls in love with her. The two decide to get married. Unfortunately, the wolf is married already. His wife and several children arrive at the wedding ceremony and put a stop to it, leaving grandma standing at the altar brokenhearted.

The 1943 American animated cartoon short subject Red Hot Riding Hood, released by MGM and directed by Tex Avery, begins as a standard adaptation of "Little Red Riding Hood". A few minutes into the film, the wolf, Red Riding Hood and her grandmother start to complain that they are tired of doing the same old story that every cartoon studio in Hollywood has already done before. They say that they want to do the story differently this time. The narrator gives in to their demands. The scene suddenly changes from the forest to present-day Los Angeles. The wolf is now a wealthy playboy, the adult Red Riding Hood is a scantily clad nightclub singer and it is implied that her grandmother runs a brothel. The wolf makes unwanted sexual advances towards Red Riding Hood. She rejects him and goes to her grandmother's apartment. The wolf follows her there. As soon as Red's grandmother sees the wolf, she falls madly in love with him. Her passion causes her to chase after the terrified wolf.

Chaperon Rouge

Wax works of Little Red Riding Hood and the wolf at the Chateau de Breteuil, Vallée de Chevreuse, France.

Tex Avery went on to direct five sequels to Red Hot Riding Hood that also feature the characters of Red and the Big Bad Wolf, namely Swing Shift Cinderella (1945),[6] The Shooting of Dan McGoo (1945), Wild and Woolfy (1945), Uncle Tom's Cabaña (1947)[7] and Little Rural Riding Hood (1949). The character of Red also appears in the direct-to-video animated films Tom and Jerry Meet Sherlock Holmes (2010), Tom and Jerry: Robin Hood and His Merry Mouse (2002) and Tom and Jerry's Giant Adventure (2013).

The story of "Little Red Riding Hood" is parodied in the 2005 independently produced American computer generated animation film Hoodwinked! The film opens with Little Red Riding Hood discovering that the wolf has disguised himself as her grandmother. Her real grandmother, who has been bound and gagged, then emerges from a closet and an ax-wielding woodsman crashes in through the window. The police arrive. Little Red Riding Hood, her grandmother, the wolf and the woodsman are made to tell their sides of the story separately to the investigating officer (a frog known as Nicky Flippers). It is revealed that the wolf is an investigative journalist who suspected Little Red Riding Hood and her grandmother of being involved in crime, the woodsman is an aspiring actor who knows nothing about woodcutting and Little Red Riding Hood's grandmother is a secret extreme sports enthusiast. The real villain of the piece is revealed not to be the wolf but a rabbit named Boingo. Hoodwinked! features the voices of Anne Hathaway as Little Red Riding Hood, Glenn Close as the grandmother, Patrick Warburton as the wolf and Jim Belushi as the woodsman. The film was a great commercial success. Having been made on a budget of less than US$8 million, it earned more than US$110 million worldwide while it was showing in theaters. Critical reaction to Hoodwinked! was mixed. The film has a 46% rating on the website Rotten Tomatoes. Although some critics praised the movie's voice cast and script, the quality of its animation was not generally well received.

A sequel to Hoodwinked!, called Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil, was released in 2011. The film's plot is set in motion when Little Red Riding Hood's grandmother and the wolf are tasked with rescuing Hansel and Gretel from the witch. The majority of the voice cast from the original film returned for the sequel, although Anne Hathaway and Jim Belushi did not. Their characters were voiced by Hayden Panettiere and Martin Short instead. Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil received overwhelmingly negative reviews. It only has an 11% rating on Rotten Tomatoes. The film also performed extremely poorly at the box office. Having been mad on a budget of US$30 million, it earned less than US$17 million worldwide during its theatrical release.

Woelfische Gutenachtgeschichte

This cartoon's German caption reads, "Once upon a time lived Little Red Riding Hood. And I ate her. End of story. Now go to sleep!"

Other animated films based on "Little Red Riding Hood" include the 1931 Betty Boop cartoon Dizzy Red Riding Hood, the 1934 Walt Disney Silly Symphony The Big Bad Wolf, the 1932 Oswald the Lucky Rabbit cartoon Grandma's Pet, the 1937 Warner Bros Merrie Melodies cartoon Little Red Walking Hood, the 1944 Bugs Bunny cartoon Little Red Riding Rabbit, the 1951 Warner Bros Merrie Melodies cartoon Goldilocks and the Jivin' Bears, the 1953 Warner Bros Looney Tunes cartoon Little Red Rodent Hood, the 1955 Warner Bros Looney Tunes cartoon Red Riding Hoodwinked, the 1957 Woody Woodpecker cartoon Red Riding Hoodlum, the 1960 Popeye cartoon Little Olive Riding Hood, the 1991 claymation film from the Soviet Union Servy Volk end Krasnaya Shapochka, the 1991 Australian animated feature film The Magic Riddle,[8] the 48-minute Japanese-American 1995 cartoon Little Red Riding Hood and the 1997 short Walt Disney cartoon Redux Riding Hood.

"Little Red Riding Hood" was adapted as the seventh episode of the American anthology TV series Faerie Tale Theatre. The episode first aired on the Showtime channel on November 10, 1983. It stars Mary Steemburgen, Malcolm McDowell and Diane Ladd. The fifth episode of the Japanese anime series Grimm's Fairy Tale Classics (Japanese: グリム名作劇場; Gurimu Meisaku Gekijō) is an adaptation of "Little Red Riding Hood". It was first shown on TV Asahi in Japan on November 18, 1987. The second episode of the American animated TV series Happily Ever After: Fairy Tales for Every Child is also an adaptation of "Little Red Riding Hood". The episode's action takes place in ancient China and it has a predominantly Asian-American voice cast. It features the voices of Mai Vu as Little Red Riding Hood and B.D. Wong as the wolf. It was first broadcast on HBO on March 19, 1995. The pilot of the American occult police procedural drama series Grimm was inspired by "Little Red Riding Hood". In the pilot, a creature that is part-human and part-wolf abducts girls who wear red clothes. Red Riding Hood, played by the Canadian actress Megan Ory, has been a recurring character in the American fantasy drama series Once Upon a Time, which has been airing on ABC since October 23, 2011.

The Russian opera Little Red Riding Hood (Russian: Красная шапочка; Krasnaja šapočka) was written by the composer César Cui in 1911. Its earliest know performance was in the city of Gomel in Belarus in 1921. The libretto by Marina Stanislavona Pol is based primarily on Charles Perrault's version of the fairy tale, although the story is given a happy ending. At the end of the opera, some hunters and woodcutters cut open the wolf's stomach and release Little Red Riding Hood and her grandmother. After the wolf's stomach is sewn up again, he feels sorry for what he has done, The hunters and woodcutters allow the wolf to live and to return to the forest on the condition that he promises to behave in the future.

The British musical theater writers Jake Brunger and Pippa Cleary adapted "Little Red Riding Hood" as a musical that was first performed at the Singapore Repertory Theatre in November 1, 2013. The German-language musical Grimm!: Die wirklich wahre Geschichte von Rotkäppchen und ihrem Wolf (""Grimm!: The Really True Story of Little Red Riding Hood and her Wolf"), with music by Thomas Zaufke and lyrics by Peter Lund, was first performed in the Austrian city of Graz on December 7, 2014.

Little Red Riding Hood appears alongside Cinderella, Rapunzel and other fairy tale characters in the stage musical Into the Woods. The musical, with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by James Lapine, was first performed at the Old Globe Theater in San Diego, California on December 4, 1986. Its first performance on Broadway was at the Martin Beck Theater on November 5, 1987. A movie adaptation of Into the Woods was released by Walt Disney Pictures in 2014. In the film, Little Red Riding Hood is played by Lilla Crawford and the wolf is played by Johnny Depp.

See also

Notes and references

  1. It is highly likely that the Brothers Grimm took this happy ending from "The Wolf and the Seven Little Kids", another fairy tale that is included in the Grimms' Children's and Household Tales, in which a mother goat rescues her offspring from a wolf's belly.
  2. There is no reference to Little Red Riding Hood's father either in the version of the story by Charles Perrault or in the one by the Brothers Grimm.
  3. A translation of Charles Perrault's "Little Red Riding Hood" is included in The Blue Fairy Book, an earlier anthology of folktales compiled by Andrew Lang, that was first published in 1889.
  4. Megan Gannon, "'Little Red Riding Hood' Tale Dates Back to First Century, Math Model Suggests",The Huffington Post, November 14, 2013
  5. Angela Cater's short story "Wolf-Alice" also references Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking-Glass
  6. As its title suggests, the 1945 Tex Avery cartoon Swing Shift Cinderella references the "Cinderella" story as well as "Little Red Riding Hood"
  7. As ts title suggests, the 1947 Tex Avery cartoon Uncle Tom's Cabaña is a parody of Harriet Beecher Stowe's 1853 novel Uncle Tom's Cabin. The cartoon is rarely seen nowadays due to its ethnic stereotyping of African-Americans.
  8. The 1991 Australian animated feature film The Magic Riddle draws on elements from "Little Red Riding Hood", "Snow White", "Sleeping Beauty", "Cinderella", "The Ugly Duckling" and The Adventures of Pinocchio.

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